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Best barn lighting ideas

Do you want your post and beam barn to be as low of an impact on the environment as possible?

Should you go completely off the grid?

Depending on what you are using your barn for you absolutely can.

One option is to install solar lights. Motion sensor solar lights are widely available and easy to install yourself. I just installed one on my shop. It was super easy to do and didn’t require any electrical wiring which is a big plus if you want to do it yourself.

Here are some d-i-y tips on installing your own motion sensor solar light.

Find a good location on your barn.

You want a clear view for the sensor to any common traffic areas. Where do you usually walk up to your barn from? Make sure the sensor points to that area.

Be sure to mount your barn light away from any doors direct path. The last thing you want to do is replace bulb after bulb, because you keep whacking it with the barn door.

Be aware of the direction of your light beam. You don’t want it to point straight at you when you are walking up to the barn. You will want to aim your solar light slightly out of your direct path. Then you won’t be blinded every time you go out to the barn.

Don’t shoot the cat!

Our Feline friends are very active at night and can set off a misaligned motion light. This can quickly drain the battery in your solar light fixture. Point your sensor high enough to avoid this.

Let the sun shine in!

Sunlight is a free lighting option. You can bring sunlight into your barn in a number of ways.

Add windows.

One of the advantages of your post and beam barn post and beam barn kit is that you can put windows almost anywhere. Even after your barn is built.

Install skylights.

Installing a few skylights in your barn will bring in much needed sunlight. Along with the benefits of free light sunshine is the worlds most natural and cheapest disinfectant. Ondura, (the roofing that comes with your barn) offers skylight panels that match the contour of the roofing panels.

What if you are going to work in your barn?

Weather it’s a wood shop, studio, or a automobile repair shop. You will need a well lit work area. You will want a light that doesn’t use a lot of energy, that has long lasting bulbs, and can cover a large area. The best solution for this might be florescent lighting. Don’t worry you don’t have to settle for some unsightly long shop lights. You can install the new florescent bulbs in any standard incandescent light fixture.

What if you want to maintain the traditional look and feel of your barn?

You can add authentic reproduction lighting. These light fixtures are now widely available.

You can light up your barn door with some nice exterior gooseneck lighting and porcelain shade.

Accent your posts and beams with some barn lamps.

Hang a big chandelier from the massive rafter beams in your grand cathedral ceiling.

Or light your aisles with some nice restoration hardware lighting.

There are many choices in barn lighting.

Don’t cheat yourself by buying the cheapest barn lighting that you can find. You will pay for it in the long run. Why not get the good ones?

Looking for more tips like these? Get the How to Build a Barn Course with your plans purchase!

Step 1: Understanding the U Bracket

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