Hey folks, it’s the Barn Geek here. Today, I want to address a common question we receive: How can I increase the inside clearance in my barn? Whether it’s about getting more height on the lower level or maximizing space on the upper level, I’ll guide you through the process.

First off, all our barns come with 3D models, allowing you to visualize and customize your design. While you can’t stray too far from the original plans without risking structural integrity, I’ll share some simple tweaks to help you achieve at least a 14-foot clearance.

Let’s take a 30 by 30 gambrel barn as an example. By default, it offers a nine-foot clearance on the lower level and a spacious ten-foot five-inch clearance in the loft. But let’s say you want more. You can add up to two feet to the posts between the tie beam and the rafter.

To demonstrate, imagine we’re adjusting the bench. By lifting the entire upper section by two feet, you’ll gain a 12-foot clearance—a significant increase. Similarly, extending the posts by two feet each will also elevate the loft area without major modifications to the original plans.

Now, if you’re aiming for more clearance in the lower level, it’s even simpler. Just open up the post and add two feet. You can gradually increase this to reach your desired height. However, keep in mind the practical limitations, such as the availability of longer beams.

For instance, try to avoid beams longer than 20 feet, as they may be challenging to source. If you’re increasing the height significantly, consider upgrading the main posts to at least six by eight or even six by ten for added stability.

Remember, every adjustment affects the overall structure, so ensure all components are appropriately resized and repositioned. Additionally, you may need to generate a new materials list based on your revised dimensions.

Overall, our barn plans are versatile and customizable to suit your needs. While these adjustments may seem complex, they’re well within reach with a bit of planning and understanding of the design principles.

If you found this video helpful, give it a thumbs up. And if you’re not yet a member of the Barn Plans Library, consider joining for access to our extensive collection of customizable designs.

Thanks for tuning in, and I’ll see you in the next video. Happy building!

Free Chicken Coop Plans

Free Chicken Coop Plans

You can build this hen house with these free chicken coop plans. It is easy to do. All you need is some rough cut lumber, a hammer, nails, and a circular saw. You can even build one with regular dimensional lumber from your local lumber yard. I built one like this for...

read more

Best exterior coating for a barn?

Question asked in the BarnGeeks Facebook Group 4/21/24 Does anybody have any recommendations of the best exterior coating for a 40x60 gambrel? Unfortunately the wood is not rough cut so it won't absorb as well as all of the beams and the frame. I used iron oxide mixed...

read more
The Best Treats for Your Chickens this Summer

The Best Treats for Your Chickens this Summer

What are the best treats for my chickens? What can I safely feed my chickens? Let's look at some common chicken treats and what makes them good for you (your wallet) and your chickens! 1. Food scraps Low waste, low cost, and tons of fun! What could be better? Chickens...

read more
Barn Kits Avalible in 2024

Barn Kits Avalible in 2024

Full Barn Kits are Back!   Have you thought to yourself, “I would sure love to build one of those BarnGeek Barns but I just wish I could get everything I need to build it in one all inclusive kit!”   Well, today is your lucky day! We are proud to announce...

read more
The Ideal Horsebarn

The Ideal Horsebarn

Picture This: In the heart of a rolling countryside, nestled among whispering trees and fields of wildflowers, stands a timber frame barn that embodies rustic elegance and timeless charm. Its sturdy wooden beams, weathered by years of standing tall against the...

read more