Selecting the right barn dominium building materials

Benefits of a timber frame barndominium

Post and beam or timber frame construction has a long history, dating back to the days of the Vikings. Just take a drive in the countryside, and you’re sure to come across several old timber frame barns. Appraisers are impressed by authentic craftsmanship and will give a higher value to a well-built post and beam barndominium compared to a standard post frame, or pole barn.

Versitility

Wooden barn homes are very versitile. They can be stained to match any desgin or left as is. A post and beam barndominium can be built small initially and have additions added on with ease, with no need to purchase new plans! Wood can easily be stained or aged to match the orginal build. 

Asthetics

Your timber frame barndominium will be a space you can truly call home. Wooden posts and beams can make a space feel truly warm and comfortable. Do you dislike the starch white homes often featured online? A post and beam barndominium will bring your home a unique but clean asthetic. Guests will be drawn upwards to gaze at open ceilings featuring beautiful wooden beams. 

A Stronger Structure

With a post and beam barndominium, you won’t have to worry about wood rot. The design features special steel brackets that anchor the posts to a concrete pier, breaking any direct contact between the wood and the concrete. The heavy steel plates used in the construction also ensure your barndominium will stand strong against the elements. There are even timber frame buildings that have been in use for over 1,000 years!

Wide Open Spaces

The weight of the roof is supported by large timbers, reducing the need for trussing and freeing up space. This space can be used in the future as a loft for more bedrooms. You can even leave the beautiful timber exposed, lowering overall costs and adding a unique touch to your barndominium. 
 

Support Local Craftsmen

By choosing wood as your barndominium building material, you’ll be supporting the local economy, as every piece of rough cut lumber used in the construction is sourced locally. In today’s economy, it’s important to keep your money close to home. Buying close to home saves on shipping costs and is better for the environment.

We will Help you Succeed!

At BarnGeek.com, we offer all the know how you need to build your barndominium, starting with the right building material for your Barndominuim Plans, so you can save money and feel good about the value you’re getting for your investment.

 See more pictures of barns in the building process at our facebook group!

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Step 1: Understanding the U Bracket

Read More about Post and Beam Barn Kits below.

Cutting Timbers in Advance: What is the best size to cut?

Cutting Timbers in Advance: What is the best size to cut?

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